Day: October 30, 2020

How to create an election map in R

If you’re mapping election results of, say, the US presidential election by state, it can make sense to just show one color of red for states won by Republicans, and one color of blue for states won by Democrats. That’s because it doesn’t matter whether a candidate wins by three thousand votes or three million: It’s “winner take all.”

But when analyzing results of a state election by county, or a city-wide election by precinct, the margin matters. It’s the overall total that decides the winner. Winning “Atlanta” itself isn’t all you need to know when looking at

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The move to dynamic distributed cloud architectures

Edge computing is getting a great deal of attention now, and for good reason. Cloud architecture requires that some processing be placed closest to the point of data consumption. Think computing systems in your car, industrial robots, and now full-blown connected mini clouds such as Microsoft’s Stack and AWS’s Outpost, certainly all examples of edge computing.

The architectural approach to edge computing—and IoT (Internet of Things), for that matter—is the creation of edge computing replicants in the public clouds. You can think of these as clones of what exists on the edge computing device or platform, allowing you to sync

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How to make election maps in R

Hi. I’m Sharon Machlis at IDG Communications, here with Episode 53 of Do More With R: Make an election map showing winners, losers, and margins of victory.

If you’re mapping election results of, say, the US presidential election by state, it can make sense to just show one color of red for states won by Republicans, and one color of blue for states won by Democrats. That’s because it doesn’t matter whether a candidate wins by a thousand votes or 3 million: It’s “winner take all.”

But when I map results of a state election by county, or a city-wide

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Netflix just made its best two plans a bit more expensive

You’ll soon have to spend a few more Washingtons to watch your favorite Netflix content in the US.

The standard plan — HD resolution, with up to two simultaneous streams — is going up from $13 a month to $14 a month. If you’re fancy and use the premium 4K tier, you’ll now have to pay $18 instead of $16. The basic 480p tier’s pricing remains the same, at $9 a month.

The price hike is effective immediately for new signups in the US, while current subscribers should see the price reflected on their upcoming bills. People in other regions

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