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Oracle open-sources Java machine learning library

Looking to meet enterprise needs in the machine learning space, Oracle is making its Tribuo Java machine learning library available free under an open source license.

With Tribuo, Oracle aims to make it easier to build and deploy machine learning models in Java, similar to what already has happened with Python. Released under an Apache 2.0 license and developed by Oracle Labs, Tribuo is accessible from GitHub and Maven Central.

Tribuo provides standard machine learning functionality including algorithms for classification, clustering, anomaly detection, and regression. Tribuo also includes pipelines for loading and transforming data and provides a suite of

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Rethinking ‘cloud bursting’ | InfoWorld

About two years ago I wrote a piece here on the concept of cloud bursting, where I pointed out a few realities:

  • Private clouds are no longer a thing, considering the current state of private cloud systems compared to the features and functions of the larger hyperscalers.
  • You need to maintain workloads on both private and public clouds for hybrid cloud bursting to work; in essence, using two different platforms.
  • It’s clear the bursting hybrid clouds concept just adds too much complexity and cost for a technology stack (the cloud) to be widely adopted by companies that want to do
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YouTube officially launches its own TikTok competitor, Shorts

TikTok is really the popular kid in social media these days, as evidenced by the massive American tech companies fighting over who gets to buy a cut of it. Others, like Instagram, have instead try to copy the format, and now YouTube has joined the fray.

YouTube today officially announced ‘Shorts,’ a short-format video feature that lives right within the main app. While the company has recently been highlighting videos that only last a few seconds long in its mobile app, Shorts takes things the next level by offering video creation tools akin to those found on TikTok and Reels.

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Amazon, Google, and Microsoft take their clouds to the edge

It might surprise you to learn that the big three public clouds – AWS, Google Could Platform, and Microsoft Azure – are all starting to provide edge computing capabilities. It’s puzzling, because the phrase “edge computing” implies a mini datacenter, typically connected to IoT devices and deployed at an enterprise network’s edge rather than in the cloud.

The big three clouds have only partial control over such key edge attributes as location, network, and infrastructure. Can they truly provide edge computing capabilities?

The answer is yes, although the public cloud providers are developing their edge computing services via strategic partnerships

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Kubernetes and cloud portability — it’s complicated

I’m so sorry. You were told that Kubernetes was your key to the golden age of multicloud nirvana. You believed that Kubernetes would give you portability to move applications seamlessly between clouds, whether running in your data center or on a public cloud. It’s not really your fault. Vendors have been promising all sorts of magical things with regard to portability and Kubernetes.

Unfortunately, Gartner just weighed in to put the kibosh on the Kubernetes-for-portability panacea. As analyst Marco Meinardi writes, when asked whether companies should embrace “Kubernetes to make their applications portable… the answer is: no.”

It’s not that

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Amazon, Google, and Microsoft take their clouds to the edge

It might surprise you to learn that the big three public clouds – AWS, Google Could Platform, and Microsoft Azure – are all starting to provide edge computing capabilities. It’s puzzling, because the phrase “edge computing” implies a mini datacenter, typically connected to IoT devices and deployed at an enterprise network’s edge rather than in the cloud.

The big three clouds have only partial control over such key edge attributes as location, network, and infrastructure. Can they truly provide edge computing capabilities?

The answer is yes, although the public cloud providers are developing their edge computing services via strategic partnerships

Read More