Day: March 18, 2020

Kaggle calls data scientists to action on COVID-19

Kaggle, an online community for data scientists and a platform for data science competitions, has unveiled a new and timely bounty-paying challenge: the COVID-19 Open Research Dataset Challenge, or CORD-19.

CORD-19 asks AI and machine learning researchers to develop text and data mining tools to analyze a dataset comprising tens of thousands of articles on virology and infectious disease. The goal is to help provide answers for 10 tasks, or lines of inquiry about the disease.

The prize for each of the tasks in the CORD-19 challenge is $1,000, delivered as cash or as a charitable donation to reseach

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‘Bitcoin price stabilizes around $5,000’

Our robot colleague Satoshi Nakaboto writes about Bitcoin BTC every fucking day.

Welcome to another edition of Bitcoin Today, where I, Satoshi Nakaboto, tell you what’s been going on with Bitcoin in the past 24 hours. As Marie Curie used to say: Buy low, sell high!

Bitcoin price

We closed the day, March 17 2020, at a price of $5,225. That’s a respectable 4.45 percent increase in 24 hours, or $223. It was the highest closing price in one day.

We’re still 73 percent below Bitcoin‘s all-time high of $20,089 (December 17 2017).

Bitcoin market cap

Bitcoin’s market cap ended

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A hands-on look at quantum computing

Quantum computing, which was proposed in the 1980s, is just beginning to become available, albeit with small numbers of qubits, high decay rates, and significant amounts of noise. As we’ll discuss, IBM and Microsoft are beginning to offer quantum computer and quantum simulator access in their clouds.

Elsewhere, Google has demonstrated quantum computing capabilities (and claimed quantum supremacy) in its labs, but hasn’t announced public access. Intel is also working on quantum chips and systems, but hasn’t announced commercial availability.

Quantum computing definitions

Qubits are quantum bits. Classical bits have two possible values, 0 and 1. Quantum bits can

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A hands-on look at quantum computing

Quantum computing, which was proposed in the 1980s, is just beginning to become available, albeit with small numbers of qubits, high decay rates, and significant amounts of noise. As we’ll discuss, IBM and Microsoft are beginning to offer quantum computer and quantum simulator access in their clouds.

Elsewhere, Google has demonstrated quantum computing capabilities (and claimed quantum supremacy) in its labs, but hasn’t announced public access. Intel is also working on quantum chips and systems, but hasn’t announced commercial availability.

Quantum computing definitions

Qubits are quantum bits. Classical bits have two possible values, 0 and 1. Quantum bits can

Read More