Dear pandemic, please go away so I can visit Super Nintendo World

For most of the 20th century, more than 60,000 people died in the US from polio, diphtheria, and small pox each year. In 2016, the American death toll from these diseases was zero. Around the globe, two to three million deaths from these diseases and others, including measles, rubella, and tetanus, are prevented each year.

These remarkable statistics are a triumph of medicine and the single most effective public health measure in history: global vaccination programs.

COVID-19, after the most rapid and sustained vaccine development program in history, now looks set to be joining this list of fatal diseases that

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Posted on 3 days ago

Facebook said It would ban holocaust deniers. Instead, its algorithm provided a network for them

For most of the 20th century, more than 60,000 people died in the US from polio, diphtheria, and small pox each year. In 2016, the American death toll from these diseases was zero. Around the globe, two to three million deaths from these diseases and others, including measles, rubella, and tetanus, are prevented each year.

These remarkable statistics are a triumph of medicine and the single most effective public health measure in history: global vaccination programs.

COVID-19, after the most rapid and sustained vaccine development program in history, now looks set to be joining this list of fatal diseases that

Read More

Posted on 3 days ago

4 ways to respond to vaccine skeptics on social media

For most of the 20th century, more than 60,000 people died in the US from polio, diphtheria, and small pox each year. In 2016, the American death toll from these diseases was zero. Around the globe, two to three million deaths from these diseases and others, including measles, rubella, and tetanus, are prevented each year.

These remarkable statistics are a triumph of medicine and the single most effective public health measure in history: global vaccination programs.

COVID-19, after the most rapid and sustained vaccine development program in history, now looks set to be joining this list of fatal diseases that

Read More

Posted on 3 days ago

Dear pandemic, please go away so I can visit Super Nintendo World

Dear pandemic, please go away so I can visit Super Nintendo World

Credit:
Universal Studios Japan

Universal Studios Japan has set a release date for the Nintendo portion of its park, which has been under construction for several years at this point. The “land,” called Super Nintendo World, will open on February 4, 2021. I would be the very first in line when they cut the ribbon, but for the global pandemic. So I really need that thing to go away so I can enjoy some real life Mario-themed shenanigans.

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Facebook said It would ban holocaust deniers. Instead, its algorithm provided a network for them

Last month, Facebook announced a crackdown: The platform would no longer permit content that “denies or distorts the Holocaust” as part of its larger policy prohibiting hate speech.

While noting that successful enforcement could take time, Monika Bickert, Facebook’s vice president of content policy, explained the ban in a blog post. “Our decision is supported by the well-documented rise in anti-Semitism globally and the alarming level of ignorance about the Holocaust, especially among young people,” she wrote.

But as of mid-November, The Markup has found, numerous Facebook pages for well-known Holocaust denial groups remain active — and for users who

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4 ways to respond to vaccine skeptics on social media

For most of the 20th century, more than 60,000 people died in the US from polio, diphtheria, and small pox each year. In 2016, the American death toll from these diseases was zero. Around the globe, two to three million deaths from these diseases and others, including measles, rubella, and tetanus, are prevented each year.

These remarkable statistics are a triumph of medicine and the single most effective public health measure in history: global vaccination programs.

COVID-19, after the most rapid and sustained vaccine development program in history, now looks set to be joining this list of fatal diseases that

Read More

Volvo thinks gaming tech can help make self-driving cars safer

Building self-driving cars is no easy matter. Underneath, self-driving cars are dedicated and specialist artificial intelligence systems, which need to be taught how to drive.

They can be taught in the real world, or in the virtual world using simulations. Companies like Tesla, Waymo, and Nuro use real-world testing to expose their AI systems to more driving scenarios.

The theory goes that the more scenarios an AI experiences, the better it will be at predicting the erratic nature of our roads and highways.

Testing in the real-world comes with a host of safety concerns about what happens if a self-driving

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Dorsey’s beard sets 3 share price records in 3 days

Square, the fintech stock led by Twitter billionaire and beard-of-the-people Jack Dorsey, is on fire.

In the past three days, Square‘s share price has set three consecutive all-time highs, both intraday and closing.

It peaked at $208 on Monday, hit $209.36 on Tuesday, and broke $214 on Wednesday to close the day up 240% for the year-to-date.

Square’s previous intraday and closing records were $201 and $198, set on November 6.

If Square was included in benchmark indices like the S&P 500 or the NASDAQ 100, it would be their fourth best performing stock in 2020.

The only stocks that’ve

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The Spurcycle bike bell is so nice, it might just be worth paying $49 for

Do you need a $49 bike bell? Probably not.

Do I regret testing the Spurcycle bike bell, said $49 trinket? Absolutely not.

I get that to some people, the idea of spending half a C-note on a bike bell is silly. You could spend a tenth of that to pick up some generic one online. You do you! But if you believe it’s worth paying a little more for good design — made in the US with a human touch — the Spurcycle bell is one of the nicest little upgrades you can make to any bike.

The bell —

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